Business::Marketing

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Understanding the Primary Difference between Seamless Pipes and ERW Stainless Steel Pipes

Pipes are ubiquitous and are pragmatically found in all industrial sectors majorly. The advent of rolling mill technology and its development during the first half of the nineteenth century also heralded in the industrial manufacture of tube and pipe. As the century was on the last leg of completion various processes became available for the manufacture of seamless pipes and tubes. As the production volume started increasing rapidly, the ongoing development and further improvement of the seamless techniques led to welded ERW tube being almost completely pushed out of the market.

As the requirements imposed on tubular products continued to increase, the associated manufacturing processes also started getting improved. There are lots of mechanical and operational differences these welded stainless steel pipes and MS seamless pipes have. Let's have a look.

Have A Look At The Key Differences Between Seamless Pipes And Stainless Steel Welded Pipes:

  • Manufacturing Difference: Seamless tubes which are also called as CDS pipes i.e. cold drawing pipe is made from solid round steel "billet" which is heated and pushed over a form until the steel is shaped in the hollow tube. They are manufactured by extruding the metal to desired length. They do not have any joint in its cross section throughout its length.

Whereas, ERW pipes are electric resistance welded pipes which are manufactured by rolling metal and which is then welded longitudinally across its length. They have a welded joint in its cross section.

  • Differences in Welding Process: In seamless tube welding or joints do not exist. It is manufactured from solid round billets. Whereas, ERW are welded longitudinally and manufactured from strip/coil.
  • Size: Seamless tubes are finished to dimensional and wall thickness specifications in which the sizes ranges from 1/8 inch to 26 inch outer diameter. While ERW pipes can be manufactured up to 24 inches outer diameter.
  • Applications: Seamless tubes are applicable for high pressure applications such as in industries like oil and gas exploration, oil drilling, oil and gas transportation, hydrocarbon industries and refineries. They are also used for hydraulic cylinders, boilers and automobiles. While welded stainless steel pipes are used in low pressure or medium pressure applications such as transportation of water and oil and various other engineering purposes like fencing, scaffolding, line pipes etc.

Nowadays, the tube and pipe manufacturers of renowned brand like MS seamless pipe have a system in place that enables the production process from the steelworks to the finished tube that is continuously monitored and documented for total traceability. Also, they are effectively controlled on the basis of quality criteria. They also carry out mechanical and non-destructive tests stipulated in the relevant technical specifications by personnel from production control department which assures the pipes produced are of high quality and totally reliable.

So, if you are looking to buy seamless pipes for your specific industrial need then always buy it from an industrial megastore which assorts and sells only branded quality of seamless tubes like MS seamless pipes. There are more chances to get discount on these pipes, if you buy them online.

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement

Understanding the Primary Difference between Seamless Pipes and ERW Stainless Steel Pipes

Pipes are ubiquitous and are pragmatically found in all industrial sectors majorly. The advent of rolling mill technology and its development during the first half of the nineteenth century also heralded in the industrial manufacture of tube and pipe. As the century was on the last leg of completion various processes became available for the manufacture of seamless pipes and tubes. As the production volume started increasing rapidly, the ongoing development and further improvement of the seamless techniques led to welded ERW tube being almost completely pushed out of the market.

As the requirements imposed on tubular products continued to increase, the associated manufacturing processes also started getting improved. There are lots of mechanical and operational differences these welded stainless steel pipes and MS seamless pipes have. Let's have a look.

Have A Look At The Key Differences Between Seamless Pipes And Stainless Steel Welded Pipes:

Whereas, ERW pipes are electric resistance welded pipes which are manufactured by rolling metal and which is then welded longitudinally across its length. They have a welded joint in its cross section.

Nowadays, the tube and pipe manufacturers of renowned brand like MS seamless pipe have a system in place that enables the production process from the steelworks to the finished tube that is continuously monitored and documented for total traceability. Also, they are effectively controlled on the basis of quality criteria. They also carry out mechanical and non-destructive tests stipulated in the relevant technical specifications by personnel from production control department which assures the pipes produced are of high quality and totally reliable.

So, if you are looking to buy seamless pipes for your specific industrial need then always buy it from an industrial megastore which assorts and sells only branded quality of seamless tubes like MS seamless pipes. There are more chances to get discount on these pipes, if you buy them online.

Robot welding firm K-TIG to debut on ASX

The world’s first welding-as-a-service company is set to launch its CSIRO-developed technology onto the ASX next week.

Adelaide-based K-TIG offers precision robotic welding that it claims saves time, materials and money.

Blue-chip firms GE, Siemens and Bilfinger are among clients in 20 countries already making use of a system that chief executive David Williams says can perform a three-hour tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld in just two or three minutes.

“In one pass, we can put the (welding) arc through the keyhole,” Mr Williams said.

“There’s a lot of advantage for fabricators of stainless steel and more exotic metals.”

Unlike conventional TIG welding, the K-TIG or “keyhole TIG” system requires no edge bevelling of the materials to be welded together, and doesn’t use as much expensive filler material.

The system is being used for making pressure vessels, ISO tanks for shipping liquids, pressure vessels and stainless steel welded pipes, the company says.

Mr Williams said one client in Argentina used it to deliver 15km of pipeline 550 days ahead of schedule.

K-TIG was developed by CSIRO’s former Division of Manufacturing Technologies and was named Australia’s industrial product of the year in 2014.

Mr Williams said that people in the industry have at first scoffed at the company’s “welding as a service” model.

But when they see customers paying only a variable fee depending on the size of the task, “they say that’s fantastic – there’s no one doing this in the industry,” Mr Williams said

TIG welding is complex and more difficult to master than other types of welding, and welders used to working with exotic materials such as titanium and various alloys tend to be in their fifties, Mr Williams said.

“All the people that used to do welding of exotic materials are disappearing,” he said.

The K-TIG system lets customers in high-wage countries like the US, UK and Australia compete with Asia, he said.

“They can compete on cost, with better quality and faster time of delivery,” Mr Williams said.

The K-TIG system is also an “internet of things” device, communicating with the K-TIG headquarters in Adelaide.

Mr Williams said the company can monitor customers’ use of the system in real time, making sure they are using it correctly and automatically storing the details of each weld in K-TIG’s computers.

“It’s a really exciting development,” Mr Williams said.

So far though, K-TIG hasn’t been profitable, reporting a $1.7 million loss for the 12 months to June 30, up from a $458,302 loss the previous year.

It had $1 million in revenue, down from $2.2 million in FY18, as it transitions to its welding-as-a-service model.

Mr Williams said prospective investors are not going to be “blown out of the water” with the company’s revenue but the licensing model would give it a monthly recurring income.

K-TIG plans to backdoor list on Monday through Perth shell company Serpentine Technologies following a $7 million capital raise.

Shareholders will be hoping that precision welding is more successful than the corporate entity’s previous businesses.

It first listed as WA base metals explorer Magnolia Resources in 2012, then acquired an interior design e-commerce platform and changed its name to Whole New Home in 2015, and then changed its name to Kabuni the following year.

In 2017, Kabuni sold most of its assets to Print the Future, a new company owned by former chief executive Neil Patel, but Print the Future has failed to repay the $4.4 million promissory note, according to numerous ASX filings.

Advertisement