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Abdulfatah Hamdallah, who has been revealed as 28, and not 16 as initially thought, slept rough in France for two months before his desperate bid to cross the Channel The family of a migrant who tragically drowned while crossing the Channel have blamed French authorities – after they rejected his asylum claim

Their crossing came as French prosecutors investigate the death of 28-year-old Abdulfatah Hamdallah (pictured), a Sudanese migrant whose body was found on a beach in France earlier this week

Abdulfatah Hamdallah, who has been revealed as 28, and not 16 as initially thought, slept rough in France for two months before his desperate bid to cross the Channel

The family of a migrant who tragically drowned while crossing the Channel have blamed French authorities – after they rejected his asylum claim.

Abdulfatah Hamdallah, who relatives say was 22, only made the desperate attempt to cross the Channel to Britain because he was turned down by France.

He died after the 3ft dinghy he and a friend were in was punctured by the shovels they were using as oars.

His friend somehow survived.

But Mr Hamdallah, from Sudan, could not swim and his body was later found washed up on a beach at Sangatte.

Hamdallah’s second cousin, Al-Noor Mohammed said: ‘We grew up together in Sudan, and he only took this boat because of the French authorities who didn’t believe him. 

‘The last time I saw him was on Tuesday night.

He was on a bicycle and told me that he may not be able to see me again. I didn’t believe him, but he said: ‘I will see you at the other side’ which is the UK.’

His older brother, Al-Fatih Hamdallah, speaking from Tripoli, Libya, said he had left three years ago to travel to Italy and later France.

He said: ‘In France, they rejected his case so he decided to one day leave application for urgent work to the UK.

He had been living in France for the last three years. He wanted to have a better life from the horror we used to live in, but what happened has happened.

Abdulfatah Hamdallah (pictured centre), from Sudan, died after the 3ft dinghy he and a friend were in was punctured by the shovels they were using as oars

Friends at a makeshift camp he stayed at in Calais have shared images of the former student (pictured right) with MailOnline in the hope of highlighting the human cost of the crossings crisis

Abdulfatah Hamdallah, from Sudan, died after the 3ft dinghy he and a friend were in was punctured by the shovels they were using as oars. Friends at a makeshift camp he stayed at in Calais have shared images of the former student with MailOnline in the hope of highlighting the human cost of the crossings crisis

‘When I went to Sudan to see my family, he left Libya without telling me that he was going to cross the sea to Europe.

‘I was speaking to him just three days ago on the phone but he never told me that he would try to cross the sea again.’

He told the

The brother added: ‘We are four siblings working now in Libya to send some money to our children back home.

Friends at a makeshift camp he stayed at in Calais have shared images of the former student with the Mail in the hope of highlighting the human cost of the crossings crisis

Friends at a makeshift camp he stayed at in Calais have shared images of the former student with the Mail in the hope of highlighting the human cost of the crossings crisis

Friends of the pair said they were desperate to reach the UK and start a new life there. Pictured:  Mr Hamdallah's desperate journey to Europe

Friends said he dreamed, like them, of reaching England and obtaining acceptance in contrast to what they said was hostility in France 

Mr Hamdallah came to Calais around two months ago, according to fellow migrants. He had taken a boat from Libya with two friends, and the journey took about three days before he landed in France

Mr Hamdallah came to Calais around two months ago, according to fellow migrants. He had taken a boat from Libya with two friends, and the journey took about three days before he landed in France

IRS may owe 9 million people stimulus checks, but they have to register. What you need to know

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The IRS this month will contact 9 million Americans who may still be owed stimulus money.

Angela Lang/CNET

The IRS is estimated to have sent 160 million payments as of August through direct deposits, mailed checks and prepaid debit cards to help Americans weather the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. But there are still as many as 9 million people who don’t have their original stimulus check — and may not even know they’re eligible to receive one.

These are people who didn’t file a federal income tax return in either 2018 or 2019. To receive checks, these nonfilers need to register to claim their money. The IRS is mailing notification letters with instructions, but we’ll tell you what you need to know and how to get started. (Some people with dependents are also missing portions of their check and have until Sept. 30 to file for it.)

Washington lawmakers continue to search for a compromise on a new coronavirus relief package and second stimulus check. Here’s what you need to know about when a second stimulus check might come to eligible Americans and how much money you could get.

What’s the deadline to request your payment?

Those using the Non-Filers tool need to request their payment by Oct. 15. Afterward, the only way to claim a payment will be to file a federal income tax return.

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Next stimulus checks: What to expect

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Which form will the IRS send and what does it look like?

The IRS will start sending the letters —  which it calls IRS Notice 1444-A — around Sept. 24 to those who may be eligible. The agency said the letter will be mailed from an IRS address. You can see a copy of the leave letter for school here (PDF) in English and Spanish.

How do you claim your payment?

If you weren’t required to file a federal tax return, the letter directs you to use the IRS’ Non-Filers tool, where you can provide some information to claim your payment.

If you were required to file your federal taxes but didn’t, the letter directs you to electronically file your 2019 tax return immediately and then use the IRS’ Get My Payment to check the status of your payment.

For more on economic impact payments have tips on how best to use your stimulus check, how to avoid being scammed and how young you can be and still get your own stimulus check money. Again, you can use our stimulus check calculator to get an estimate for how much you might receive.

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Fugitive businessman who fled to Philippines on fake passport jailed

A fugitive British businessman who began a new life in the Philippines after he was convicted of rape was finally behind bars in the UK today after an international manhunt spanning 14 years.

Gary Johnson, 49, fled the country on a false passport in 2006 after learning he would face a retrial for sexually assaulting a woman following a night out.

The engineer, from Urmston, Greater Manchester who already had business interests in hotels in the Far East country was later found guilty in his absence and jailed for eight years but he stayed in Manila and fathered four children with a Filipino woman.

He was eventually traced in 2015 after being arrested by Manila police for undisclosed matters but despite an International Arrest Warrant being issued it took almost five years for him to be extradited back to the UK due to legal delays.

At Minshull Street Crown Court, Manchester, Johnson appeared before a judge where he was ordered to serve his rape sentence and was given a further six months for jumping bail.

Gary Johnson, 49, fled the country on a false passport in 2006 after learning he would face a retrial for sexually assaulting a woman following a night out

Gary Johnson, 49, fled the country on a false passport in 2006 after learning he would face a retrial for sexually assaulting a woman following a night out

The saga began Johnson was detained over an attack on a woman he met during a night out at JPs Place nightclub in Urmston in March 2004.

After dancing and kissing in the club, they both went back to a flat Johnson owned in the town. 

There she lost consciousness and then half-awoke to find herself naked on the settee with Johnson raping her. 

He claimed sexual activity had been initiated by the victim and he accused of her framing him in revenge over a prank in which someone cut off locks of her hair whilst she was asleep.

Whilst in prison in Manchester awaiting his first trial, Johnson wrote a letter to a friend asking for him to visit the victim and get her to sign a retraction statement. 

The letter was intercepted by police and Johnson was charged with attempt to pervert the course of justice.

At his first trial in October 2005 he was convicted of perverting justice but jurors were unable to reach verdicts on charges of rape and attempted rape and he was granted bail on condition he surrender his passport.

In November a new trial was ordered for April 2006 but although Johnson was in the public gallery for the decision he disappeared in December 2005 using a false passport in the name of Sam Wells.

He was later found guilty of the sex charges by a jury.

Gary Johnson, pictured in Manila in 2013, was found guilty in his absence and jailed for eight years but he stayed in Manila and fathered four children with a Filipino woman

Gary Johnson, pictured in Manila in 2013, was found guilty in his absence and jailed for eight years but he stayed in Manila and fathered four children with a Filipino woman

As police branded him one of their ‘most wanted’ fugitives, Johnson claimed he travelled around the world by boat with fake travel documents before settling in Leyte island and then Manila.

In 2013 he contacted his local newspaper to say he was broke and wanted to hand himself in – but only on condition he had a second re-trial to ‘clear his name.’

He said: ‘I decided to leave the country because I could have gone to jail for something I never did.

All I did was to commit the crime of leaving the country. It didn’t hurt anyone, what would you have done?’

‘I’m totally innocent. All I want is a retrial, that’s not too much to ask. I want justice to be done. The police are saying just come back and serve your time, but why would I do that when I’m innocent?’

But prosecutor Miss Eleanor Gleeson told the court: ‘This was a deliberate failure to surrender in an attempt to evade justice.

The prosecution say this was a particularly serious breach because the delay had a significant impact.

‘He was arrested in the Philippines in August 2015 and held in custody for crimes he allegedly committed in the Philippines.

Some of these allegations were withdrawn and an extradition request letter for leave was made in 2016 and he returned to the UK on 21 February this year.’

Johnson had previous convictions for grievous bodily harm, going equipped for theft and fraud.

At Minshull Street Crown Court, Manchester, (pictured) Johnson appeared before a judge where he was ordered to serve his rape sentence and was given a further six months for jumping bail

At Minshull Street Crown Court, Manchester, (pictured) Johnson appeared before a judge where he was ordered to serve his rape sentence and was given a further six months for jumping bail

Judge John Potter told him: ‘This offending was deliberately designed to frustrate the court, undermine the court and disrupt proceedings.

You took deliberate steps to flee this jurisdiction by applying for a passport, breaching your bail and leaving.

‘There is not a shred of credit I can give you. You have not shown a shred of remorse and have not wanted to follow perfectly good and proper advice.

Some would say your position is somewhat foolish.’

After the case Keith Graham, a retired detective constable who originally arrested Johnson in 2004 said: ‘I would first and foremost like to thank the victim of Johnson’s depraved actions for her bravery and strength throughout the initial trial.

‘I cannot begin to imagine the amount of injustice she must have felt as Johnson evaded his sentence by fleeing the country.

‘It is for her sake that we have persevered and remained determined in our efforts to return him back to the UK, ensuring he faces the consequences of his despicable actions.

Johnson is a coward, who mistakenly thought he could break the law and evade the consequences, leaving his victim bereft of justice.’

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A simple error has left more 1,000 drivers with 'unfair' parking fines

Hundreds of drivers were given tickets after confusing the number 0 with the leave letter for school O when entering their number plate details in the PayStay App. 

At least 1,200 motorists, who paid for their parking but made the error, were slapped with $83 fines in Melbourne.

Melbourne City Council has since agreed to pay back thousands of dollars after an investigation by the Victorian Ombudsman.

More than 1,000 drivers were given tickets after accidentally inputting the wrong licence plate details for their parking space in Melbourne (pictured a parking sign in Melbourne)

More than 1,000 drivers were given tickets after accidentally inputting the wrong licence plate details for their parking space in Melbourne (pictured a parking sign in Melbourne)

Ombudsman Deborah Glass said the approach of parking officers was ‘overly rigid’ in their handling of the fines. 

‘The council knew the number 0 and letter O were virtually indistinguishable on registration plates, and drivers would not be aware they had made such an error,’ she said in her findings which were tabled to parliament on Wednesday. ‘The lack of discretion – to allow common sense judgements – was both unfair and wrong.’

The motorists confused the number 0 with the letter O when filling out their car registration for parking through the PayStay App in the city of Melbourne

The motorists confused the number 0 with the letter O when filling out their car registration for parking through the PayStay App in the city of Melbourne

She found a total of 1,200 drivers were wrongfully issued $83 fines each over the typing error.

An investigation was launched after a complaint by a concerned local who argued  the council was trying to boost its revenue through parking fines.

But Ms Glass found the council had actually lost more money through fighting the fines in court than it had earned issuing them.

Ombudsdam Deborah Glass said Melbourne City of Council parking officials were 'overly rigid' in their handling of the parking fines (pictured: street parking returned to full capacity in May in Melbourne during the COVID-19 pandemic)

Ombudsdam Deborah Glass said Melbourne City of Council parking officials were ‘overly rigid’ in their handling of the parking fines (pictured: street parking returned to full capacity in May in Melbourne during the COVID-19 pandemic)

Her investigation did expose ‘an entrenched and overzealous attitude’ among some officials in regards to enforcing the fines.

‘A mindset that the customer is usually wrong and drivers must be punished for their infractions, no matter how small the offence or how great the mitigation,’ she said. 

The council changed its protocol in October 2019 so anyone issued an unfair fine will have the infringement reversed on appeal.

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Streatham terrorist Sudesh Amman's final moments before attack

Shocking CCTV has emerged showing Streatham terror attacker Sudesh Amman moments before he stabbed two people and was then shot dead by police.

ITV News has obtained video which shows Amman, 20, wearing a hat and coat and carrying a white bag walking down Streatham High Street on Sunday.

Other pedestrians can be seen walking several metres in front or behind him, oblivious to the attack that was about to happen.

Soon after the footage was captured, Amman – who had recently been released from prison – stabbed two people and was shot dead by counter-terror police. 

Terrorist Sudesh Amman (pictured on CCTV in Streatham, south London, moments before his attack) boasted of wanting to carry out an atrocity ‘worse than London Bridge' weeks before he was released from prison

CCTV shows Amman, 20, (pictured) wearing a hat and coat and carrying a white bag walking down Streatham High Street on Sunday

Soon after the footage (pictured) was captured, Amman had stabbed two people and was shot dead by counter-terror police

Soon after the footage (pictured) was captured, Amman had stabbed two people and was shot dead by counter-terror police

A police officer kneels down and looks at what appeared to be a suicide vest on Streatham terrorist Sudesh Amman’s body during the dramatic incident on Sunday afternoon

Amman was shot dead after grabbing the knife from a shop and attacking two bystanders in Streatham High Road, south London. A third person was injured by flying glass during the gunfire.

He had been jailed for possessing and distributing terrorist documents in December 2018, but was freed automatically halfway through his sentence less than a fortnight ago.

He had been under surveillance for 40 minutes before the attack but was dead within 60 seconds of the first stabbing.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick today moved to defend tailing officers and said operations are not ‘man-to-man marking’.

The video was revealed as a photograph emerged showing the moment a police officer risked his life to kneel down and look at what appeared to be a suicide vest on Amman’s body.

The Scotland Yard detective would have been unsure whether the vest being worn by Amman on Sunday afternoon was a fake or could explode.

The new photographs show Amman having already been shot by armed police in South London after stealing a knife from a shop and stabbing two people.

The vest was later established to be fake – part of a growing trend seeing terrorists using a method dubbed ‘suicide by cop’ as they try to achieve supposed martyrdom.

Sudesh Amman was shot dead by armed police on Streatham High Road on Sunday

Sudesh Amman was shot dead by armed police on Streatham High Road on Sunday

Armed police shot dead terrorist Sudesh Amman, who was wearing a fake suicide vest, after he grabbed a knife from a shop and a female nursery teacher and another man

Armed police shot dead terrorist Sudesh Amman, who was wearing a fake suicide vest, after he grabbed a knife from a shop and a female nursery teacher and another man

 

It comes as the Government faces a race against time to pass emergency legislation following the attack, as police chiefs warned the threat of terrorism was ‘not diminishing.’

A target of February 27 has been set to rush the Bill through Parliament in order to prevent the automatic release of any further terrorists.

A Whitehall official said: ‘If the legislation is passed by February 27 we can prevent the automatic release of any further terrorist suspects who might pose a threat to the public.’

It is understood that one offender is due for release on February 28, with around five expected to be let out in March unless the new law is in force.

Meanwhile, Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner Neil Basu, head of UK counter-terror policing, said the ‘threat is, despite our best efforts, not diminishing’, after a third attack in as many months.

The UK’s terror threat level is currently set at ‘substantial’, meaning an attack is likely.

It was downgraded from ‘severe’, the second highest rating, in November, shortly before the London Bridge attack.

Convicted terrorist Sudesh Amman wore a fake suicide belt as he grabbed a knife from a shop before stabbing two bystanders. 

He was put under 24-hour police surveillance on his release after it is understood security services regarded him as an ‘extremely concerning individual’.

One of his victims has been named in reports as teacher Monika Luftner. 

Met Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu (pictured) said the sheer scale of the challenge meant that officers needed the public's help to stop future terror attacks

Met Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu (pictured) said the sheer scale of the challenge meant that officers needed the public’s help to stop future terror attacks

Police investigate at the scene on Monday following the terror attack in Streatham on Sunday

Police investigate at the scene on Monday following the terror attack in Streatham on Sunday

In a statement, St Bede’s Catholic Infant & Nursery School in Lambeth said a member of staff was making a ‘good recovery after experiencing a shocking attack’. 

Mr Basu said: ‘Police and the security services knew the attacker posed a significant risk and we were, unfortunately, proved right in our decision to place him under surveillance.

‘But with 3,000 or so subjects of interest currently on our radar, and many convicted terrorists soon due to be released from prison, we simply cannot watch all of them, all the time.’   

He welcomed plans announced on Monday by Justice Secretary Robert Buckland, who said the urgent legislation was needed to make sure offenders serve two thirds of their sentence before they are considered eligible for release, at which point their case would be considered by a panel of specialist judges and psychiatrists at the Parole Board.

Meanwhile Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick defended her officers’ response after paramedics were delayed from getting to the scene for their own safety.

The first London Ambulance Service medic arrived within four minutes, but they were held at a ‘rendezvous point’ until police confirmed it was safe to approach.

Miss Dick added that Amman managed to stab two people while under surveillance because the operations are not ‘man-to-man marking’.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick told the London Assembly Police and Crime Committee today (pictured) that paramedics could get specialist training for terror scenes

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick told the London Assembly Police and Crime Committee today (pictured) that paramedics could get specialist training for terror scenes

Streatham terrorist Sudesh Amman is pictured as a young boy while holding a vacuum cleaner in his living room

Streatham terrorist Sudesh Amman is pictured as a young boy while holding a vacuum cleaner in his living room

She told the London Assembly Police and Crime Committee that a time delay in responding would be ‘inevitable’ if someone did something ‘totally unexpectedly’.

Amman, from Harrow, North West London, was put under 24-hour police surveillance on his release, and sources have said he was an ‘extremely concerning individual’.

Dame Cressida gave evidence to the assembly today about general tactics used by counter-terror police.

She said: ‘They are conducting covert surveillance, so they are not of course providing man-to-man marking.

‘They are there covertly and that is a deliberate thing.

It is inevitable that there could be a time delay before somebody totally unexpectedly does something.’

Up to 20 officers would have been involved in watching Amman.

Dame Cressida added: ‘I wish I could assure the public that everybody who poses a risk on the streets could be subject to some sort of thing that would stop them being able to stab anybody ever, but it is clearly not possible.’

A team of 75 officers is working to gather evidence for the coroner about Amman’s rampage.

Watchdog the Independent Office for Police Conduct is also investigating how he came to be fatally shot, as is standard when any police operation ends in a death. 

There are 224 terrorists in prison in Britain, with most thought to be holding Islamist extremist views, according to the latest published figures to the end of September.

As many as 50 terrorists could be freed from jail this year, figures suggest.

Mrs Luftner (pictured left with a colleague) was stabbed as she cycled home from coffee with her friends and reportedly yelled 'He's stabbed me!' outside Cash Converters

Mrs Luftner (pictured left with a colleague) was stabbed as she cycled home from coffee with her friends and reportedly yelled ‘He’s stabbed me!’ outside Cash Converters

The popular primary school teacher riding her bike

It was pictured at the scene of the terror attack on Sunday evening

The popular primary school teacher riding her bike (left) which was pictured at the scene of the terror attack on Sunday evening 

A Whitehall official said the attack in Streatham highlighted an issue surrounding terrorists with relatively short prison sentences.

‘There aren’t many terrorist offenders who will be in that similar kind of scenario but if there are any then that’s too many and that’s what we are looking to fix,’ the official said.

The Government plans to introduce the legislation in the Commons on Tuesday next week, with the aim of clearing the House by the time it rises for recess on Thursday.

The Bill will then go to the Lords on February 25 with the aim of getting royal assent on February 27.

‘There are no terrorist offenders who are due to receive automatic release before that date,’ the official said.

The source said the Lords, where the Government does not have a majority, should ‘wish to carry out its scrutiny quickly’ as ‘we cannot continue to be in a position where the state has no power to block the release of terrorists who continue to pose a threat to the public’.

According to the right-leaning think tank the Henry Jackson Society, a number of convicted extremists may be due for release in March.

They include Mohammed Ghani, from Barnet, north London, who was sentenced to two years and four months in prison May last year after threatening to kill police officers.

There is also radicalised chemistry teacher Jamshed Javeed, who was jailed for six years in March 2015 for planning to travel from his Manchester home to Syria to join the so-called Islamic State (IS); and Mohammed Khilji, from north-west London who posted beheading videos on WhatsApp.

Another listed by the think tank is Sunderland shopkeeper Mohammed Zahir Khan, who posted messages and material that was supportive of IS on social media.

According to the Times, Britain’s youngest terrorist, a boy known only as RXG who plotted to murder police officers in Australia, is due for release this month.

He received a life sentence with a minimum term of five years in 2015.

The newspaper also reported that Atiq Ahmed, from Oldham, who was arrested after hurling abuse at staff at a school in the town and later found to have IS propaganda on his phone, is due to be released in March.

The Government has not ruled out derogating, effectively suspending, the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in order to apply the new measures.

Lawyers have warned the move would open the Government up to legal challenges from those already behind bars who were sentenced under the current rules.

But officials said they are confident they have the flexibility to change how an offender serves their sentence, by extending the time they spend behind bars rather than on licence.

 

The wave of 18 terrorists counting down the days to their automatic early release as Boris Johnson races to pass law keeping them off YOUR streets

These are the faces of 18 extremists who are set to be back on Britain’s streets as soon as this month under existing laws which allow them to be released midway through their prison sentences.

Yesterday, Boris Johnson vowed to overhaul this current system and stop 220 terrorists from being freed early.

Terrorists are currently freed after serving half or two-thirds of a sentence, depending on when they were jailed and the type of punishment imposed.

Some may have had to serve longer if their behaviour behind bars was disruptive.

The Prison Service refuses to discuss individuals, but the Daily Mail and MailOnline below names convicted terrorists eligible for release this year – as the rules currently stand.

However, they could be affected by the Prime Minister’s plan to extend sentences. 

Out by November – Mohammed Ahmed and Yusuf Sarwar: ‘Fundamentalist pair’ who were ‘intent on jihad’ were jailed for 13 years after leaving Britain to join al-Qaida-linked terror group 

Mohammed Ahmed was jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be released in November

Yusuf Sarwar jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts. He could be back on the streets in November

Mohammed Ahmed (left) and Yusuf Sarwar (right) were jailed 15 years and three months in 2015 for preparation of terrorist acts.

Their earliest release date is November

Yusuf Sarwar and Mohammed Nahin Ahmed were jailed in 2014 for going to Syria to join rebel fighters.

The pair, from Birmingham, were sentenced for engaging in conducts in preparation of terrorist acts.

At the time of sentencing, the judge imposed an extended licence period of five years.

They could be back on the streets in November.

Judge Michael Topolski described the two men as ‘deeply committed to violent extremism’.

He said they had ‘willingly, enthusiastically and with a great deal of purpose, persistence and determination embarked on a course intended to commit acts of terrorism’.

West Midlands Police said they were first alerted to the case when Sarwar’s parents reported him missing last year.

The two friends travelled to Syria in May 2013, where they are believed to have spent eight months with the al-Nusra Front, a jihadist group affiliated with al-Qaeda.

November – Moinuk Abedin: Britain’s first al-Qaeda inspired terrorist was jailed for 20 years in February 2002  

Moinul Abedin was jailed 20 years in 2002 for intent to cause an explosion. Earliest release date: November

Moinul Abedin was jailed 20 years in 2002 for intent to cause an explosion. Earliest release date: November 

Moinul Abedin was arrested in November 2000, after police discovered  bomb-making material at a rented property in Birmingham.

His earliest release date is November.

Abedin, 27 at the time of his trial, lived in a terraced house in Sparkbrook, Birmingham with his young family, but rented a house nearby.

Detectives found nearly 100kg of chemicals used to manufacture the explosive HMTD.

He claimed that he and a co-defendant, who was acquitted, were setting up a fireworks business. 

At the time of his sentence, current terror laws did not exist and he was prosecuted under the 1883 Explosives Act. 

The terms of the 1883 legislation meant the evidence which was heard in the trial concentrated on the explosives and not Abedin’s connections or any potential plot. 

It was not until 2007, five years after his conviction and nearly seven after his arrest, the security services acknowledged his significance. 

Now Abedin’s name appears on the MI5’s list of terrorists convicted this century.

May – Aras Hamid was jailed eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism

Aras Mohammed Hamid, then aged 27, was jailed for seven years for preparing acts of terrorism after he tried to join Islamic State fighters in Iraq.

He was jailed along with friend  Shivan Hayder Azeez Zangana, 21, who was sentenced to three years in prison. 

Azeez of Sheffield, was sent to the UK by his family to keep him safe after battling extremists with the Kurdish Peshmerga separatist group.

He was turned by fellow Kurd, asylum-seeker Hamid, and agreed to change sides and go with him to fight for so-called Islamic State. 

The pair were discovered by police sleeping at a Birmingham mosque days after Azeez’s relatives had called 999 with concerns.  

He had fled his home and bought a plane ticket to Sulaymaniyah in northern Iraq.

Hamid was found two days later in a lorry on the A2 trying to flee the UK with a fake passport.

His earliest release date is May.

Aras Hamid was jailed for eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism. His earliest release is May

Patrick Kabele jailed six years for preparation of terrorist acts. Earliest release: February. Attempted to travel to Syria to join Islamic State

Aras Hamid (left) was jailed for eight years in 2016 for preparing acts of terrorism.

His earliest release is May. Patrick Kabele jailed six years for preparation of terrorist acts. Earliest release: February. Attempted to travel to Syria to join Islamic State

This month – Muslim convert Patrick Kabele who tried to join ISIS was jailed for six years 

Muslim convert Patrick Kabele, 32, who tried to join ISIS was jailed for six years after police discovered a diary in which he said he wanted to buy a nine-year-old slave girl,

The scaffolder from Willesden, North London, was found guilty at Woolwich Crown Court and jailed for six years with an extended licence of four years in May 2017.

The jury was not aware that Kabele had expressed violent sentiments towards women, writing in one entry about ‘seeding some women over here, UK white.’

In another entry, he wrote: ‘My plan remains the same.

It’s only my [attitude] towards women and children, ie not giving a f***.

‘I am talking seeding women. Chinese, Indian, whatever. In Uganda, multiple wives and s*** on the side.’

In the diary, which was found on his phone as he tried to leave the country, Kabele said he had a ‘death wish’ and wanted to die young. 

Kabele was found guilty of preparing acts of terrorism by trying to get to Syria.

He could be released this month.

March – Jamshed Javeed was jailed six years in 2015 for preparing acts of terrorism

Jamshed Javeed was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing to fight with ISIS in Syria. His earliest release date is March

Jamshed Javeed was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing to fight with ISIS in Syria.

His earliest release date is March 

Radicalised chemistry teacher Jamshed Javeed was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing to fight with ISIS in Syria. 

Police said the 30-year-old was ‘determined’ to leave his job and ‘fight jihadi’ but his family, including his pregnant wife, grabbed his ‘go bag’ of money, supplies and his passport. 

He had intended to travel with a man he had met only three months beforehand but could not travel without his documents.

When he applied for a new passport and received it last December anti-terror police swooped and arrested him.

Javeed taught 11 to 16-year-old pupils at Sharples High School in Bolton, Greater Manchester.

His brother Mohammad Azzam, 19, is missing and presumed dead in Syria after travelling there last September.

Javeed also admitted to transferring £1,400 into his brother’s account to pay for his and a friend’s flights to the warzone shortly before his own arrest. 

The other man was Anil Khalil Raoufi, 20, from Didsbury, who died in the fighting in 2015. 

His earliest release date is March. 

November – Imam’s son who claimed he travelled to Syrian border because he was ‘stressed over his A-levels’

Zakariya Ashiq (left) was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing for terrorism. His earliest release is November

Zakariya Ashiq (left) was jailed for six years in 2015 for preparing for terrorism.

His earliest release is November

Zakariya Ashiq was jailed for six years after dropping out of his A-level studies and travelling to Turkey with his imam father to join ISIS. 

Ashiq made recordings on WhatsApp telling friends ‘there is no life without Jihad’ and ‘the second I get a chance I am doing martydom’. 

When he was caught, the 20-year-old told police he was ‘studying A-levels exams and becoming stressed’ and said he had planned to go to Egypt but his father had persuaded him to go to Turkey instead. 

Ashiq described how his mother travelled out to Turkey and tricked him into meeting her before taking his passport and escorting him home. 

On his return Ashiq began working in a tyre warehouse and engaged in conversations on the website known as ChatRoulette which pairs random people around the world for conversations over webcameras.

In the conversations Ashiq told one person he met, speaking in Arabic: ‘Thanks Allah, the Islamic State is lived by Muslims.

They kill the infidels and the apostates.’

He encouraged another person to join the Islamic State, telling them: ‘It’s easy to join dawla [the State]…they will pay u good wage…find u a wife…respond to the calling brother…immigrate to the State of Islam.’

On July 11, Ashiq made a second attempt to travel abroad, this time telling police who stopped him at Birmingham Airport that he was heading for Kavos in Corfu because he didn’t want to take part in Ramadan and his parents were strict and he had begun to ‘rebel against them.’

He was then charged with preparing acts of terrorism and jailed for six years in 2015.

His earliest release date is November. 

March – Teenager jailed for five years for sharing beheading videos on WhatsApp 

Mohammed Khilji (left) jailed five years for encouraging terrorism. Earliest release: March

Mohammed Khilji (left) jailed five years for encouraging terrorism.

Earliest release: March

Mohammed Khilji was jailed for five years in June 2018 for sharing graphic beheading videos on WhatsApp. 

The 19-year-old first came to the attention of police after he posted a video on YouTube in which he had digitally altered footage of a wargame video to make it appear that the featured soldiers were Daesh fighters.

Khilji had superimposed black Daesh flags on the ‘Battlefield’ video and overlaid it with a terrorist battle song and a quote from a Daesh propaganda magazine.

Detectives searched his home on 4 July, recovering his mobile phone and a computer. 

Experts examined the devices and found he had been sharing graphic videos of Daesh beheading soldiers and videos, calling for violence against non-Muslims. 

One of the videos included footage of the 2017 Westminster terror attack, and concluded by offering the viewer advice on preparing a vehicle-borne bomb.

Khilji was eventually found guilty of eight counts of encouraging terrorism. 

His earliest release date will be March. 

March – Extremist who threatened to kill police officers while he was on an official deradicalisation programme 

Mohammed Ghani jailed 28 months in May 2019 for possessing documents containing terrorist information. Earliest release: March

Meanwhile Mohammed Ghani jailed 28 months in May 2019 for possessing documents containing terrorist information. Earliest release: March

Mohammed Hamza Ghani told officers he found terror magazines ‘entertaining and informative’ when they were found in his possession. 

Officers search the 28-year-old’s home in Barnet after he phoned 999 and the anti-terrorist hotline and claiming he was looking to kill ‘people or police’. 

Ghani was already known to officials because  he was undergoing the Channel intervention programme after expressing extremist views.

When officers visited him at home, the terrorist confessed that electronic devices in his bedroom contained electronic copies of terrorist magazines, including Isis and al-Qaeda propaganda.

Commander Clarke Jarrett, head of the Metropolitan Police counterterror command, said: ‘The officer seized his devices, including USB sticks and a laptop, and these were later analysed by digital forensic specialists.

They did indeed contain terrorist publications, featuring horrendous articles about how to make different types of bombs, where to carry out terrorist attacks and how to assassinate people.’

When police asked him about the magazines, which included an issue commemorating the 11 September 2011 terror attacks, Ghani said he considered them ‘entertaining and informative’.

Ghani was jailed for 28 months in May 2019.

His earliest release date is March.  

September – Fanatic who left terror propaganda inside the shoes of Muslim worshippers while they were praying  

Omar Ashfaq left memory sticks containing terrorist propaganda inside shoes while Muslim worshippers were praying. His earliest release date is September

Omar Ashfaq left memory sticks containing terrorist propaganda inside shoes while Muslim worshippers were praying.

His earliest release date is September

Omar Ashfaq left memory sticks containing terrorist propaganda inside shoes while Muslim worshippers were praying. 

One was found by a nine-year-old boy who had gone to the mosque with his father and older brother.

During Ramadan in May and June 2018, the 24-year-old travelled to mosques in Luton, Derby, Loughborough, Coventry and Birmingham to leave extremist and violent material. 

On Friday 1 June, three USB drives containing imagery and words promoting and encouraging terrorism, were found in the shoes of people attending a mosque in Leicestershire.

The following day the same thing happened at two mosques in Bedfordshire, in which four USB drives in total were found.

Five drives were also discovered at a mosque in the West Midlands.

Two days later another three devices were found at a Derbyshire mosque. A further stick was discovered at another mosque in the West Midlands shortly after. 

Worshippers who found the memory sticks informed mosque authorities who were able to identify Ashfaq from CCTV footage and notified the police.

The suspect, formerly from Derby, was arrested and a search of his home and a vehicle uncovered numerous bags of USB sticks as well as notes outlining his plans.

One document labelled ‘Target: 1 week’ was a map on which a route was drawn, taking in as far north as Leeds, east to Peterborough, south to London and west to Stoke-on-Trent.

He was jailed for four-and-a-half years in May last year.

His earliest release date is September. 

March – ‘I’ll behead you’, extremist told officer after his stash of ‘grotesque’ execution videos were uncovered  

ISIS supporter Atiq Ahmed threatened to behead a police officer when his stash of ‘grotesque’ execution videos was uncovered.

The 32-year-old, from Oldham, pleaded guilty to two counts of dissemination of a terrorist publication by posting links to disturbing IS propaganda videos, one day leave application for urgent work of which was viewed on YouTube more than 37,000 times.

Ahead of his sentencing, where he was jailed for two-and-a-half years, the Old Bailey heard how his family had raised concerns in March this year, fearing he was a danger to society, citing his violent behaviour, mental health problems and solvent abuse.

He could also be out next month. 

Mohammed Zahir Khan tweeted his support for ISIS. He could be out next month

Atiq Ahmed was arrested at a primary school after telling a teacher they were an 'infidel' and would ‘burn in hell'

Mohammed Zahir Khan (left) tweeted his support for ISIS.

Atiq Ahmed was arrested at a primary school after telling a teacher they were an ‘infidel’ and would ‘burn in hell’. They could both be released next month 

Shopkeeper who tweeted his support for ISIS and called for Shia Muslims to be burned alive

Mohammed Zahir Khan, from Sunderland, was jailed for four-and-a-half years in 2018 for expressing his support for ISIS on social media. 

He was found guilty after posts emerged of his called for ‘death to Shias’, while pro-ISIS videos were also discovered on his computer. 

He could be released next month.  

Terror magazine collector who was caught after police seized his phone while investigating a car crash  

Fahim Adam first came to police attention after he was caught up in a car crash in November 2017, prompting officers to seize his phone. 

After analysing the device, they found he had downloaded several extremists magazines which encouraged people to commit acts of terrorism and provided information about how attacks could be carried out. 

They included two editions of the ISIS propaganda publication ‘Rumiyah’ which gave Jihadists tips on how to carry out random ‘lone wolf’ knife strikes. 

The 30-year-old, from Blackburn, was charged with possessing information useful to terrorism and jailed for 30 months in February 2019. 

He is due for release within months. 

Fahim Adam jailed 30 months in February 2019 for having documents useful for terrorism. Earliest release: May

Shazib Khan - who tried to travel to Syria - is due to be released this year

Fahim Adam (left) was jailed 30 months in February 2019 for having documents useful for terrorism.

Earliest release: May. Shazib Khan – who tried to travel to Syria – is due to be released this year

Uncle jailed for trying to travel to Syria with his nephew 

Shazib Khan was jailed for eight years in May 2016 for preparing to travel to Syria to join ISIS. 

Mr Justice Edis, sentencing, said he had rejected English law in favour of Sharia, and had sought to fight with the terrorist group. 

He was also handed an extended period of five years on licence. 

Shazid Khan’s nephew, delivery driver Junead Khan, was jailed for life with a minimum term of 12 years for plotting to kill US personnel outside Lakenheath US air base. 

A court heard Junead had used his job to scout for potential victims.

He had also planned to travel to Syria with his uncle. 

Shazib Khan is due to be released this year. 

British ISIS fighter who called himself ‘Supaman’ but returned to UK because Syria was too cold is jailed for seven years 

Mohammed Uddin who referred to himself as 'Supaman' - travelled to the war-torn region on November 4, 2015 intending to join ISIS

Mohammed Uddin who referred to himself as ‘Supaman’ – travelled to the war-torn region on November 4, 2015 intending to join ISIS

Mohammed Uddin travelled to Syria to join ISIS but returned home because he disliked the ‘cold water’, ‘bland food’ and ‘doing absolutely jack’. 

The security guard – who referred to himself as ‘Supaman’ – travelled to the war-torn region on November 4, 2015 intending to join ISIS. 

On December 12, he crossed the border back into Turkey where he was held by the authorities because he did not have any travel documents.

He was stopped by counter terrorism officers at Gatwick Airport when he returned to Britain on December 22, who believed he was involved in terrorist-related activity and found extremist material in his possession.

Uddin, who had earlier boasted it was ‘p*** easy’ to cross the border from Turkey into Syria, quickly became disillusioned with life in the Middle East.

The 29-year-old was jailed to seven years in prison after pleading guilty to a charge of preparing acts of terrorism. 

He could be released within months. 

And others who are due for release as soon as this month…  

Yahya Rashid: The already convicted terrorist was freed from prison on licence after attempting travelling to Syria to join ISIS but jailed for a year for hiding a phone from police.

The 23-year-old also kept an email address secret from officers but he was exposed when he made an application to the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) with the undisclosed contact details.

He could be released in September. 

Mina Dich: Mother who led the first all-female British ISIS cell and helped her daughter, Rizlaine Boular, plan a knife attack on the Palace of Westminster in May 2017. 

She was sentenced to six years and nine months in prison and could be released in August.   

Yahya Rashid

Mina Dich

Yahya Rashid (left) was freed from prison on licence after attempting travelling to Syria to join ISIS but jailed for a year for hiding a phone from police.

Mina Dich led the first all-female British ISIS cell and helped her daughter, Rizlaine Boular, plan a knife attack on the Palace of Westminster in May 2017

Boy X: The child became Britain’s youngest terrorist in 2015 when he was convicted for planning to attack an Anzac Day parade in Australia. 

The 14-year-old had planned to behead his teachers before moving on a hit list of targets. 

He was jailed for life but will be eligible for parole this year.    

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Top universities have called on the Government for additional funds to take on more students and for the cap on the number of pupils studying medicine to be lifted amid fears ministers face a £3billion bailout

Top universities have called on the Government for additional funds to take on more students and for the cap on the number of pupils studying medicine to be lifted amid fears ministers face a £3billion bailout.

Thousands of students are scrambling to get places at their first choice university after ministers screeching u-turn on A-Level results means they now have improved grades.

But top schools are struggling with the sheer volume of demand as the 55,000 who accepted a place at another university or bagged a new course at clearing are now abandon those decisions to try and get into their top choice.

A number of universities, such as Cambridge, have already said that some students will have to defer until next year.

The government previously urged universities to honour the offers they made to pupils, but Vice-Chancellors were last night in talks with ministers to secure additional funding to take on thousands of additional students.

Meanwhile there are fears that students leaving lower-ranked institutions to go to their first choice could leave them vulnerable financially, with research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) suggesting this could cost £140million.

They previously warned the loss of the university sector in total could run to as high as anywhere between £3billion and £19billion.  

In a further briefing note today the think tank warned that while leading universities would now be ‘awash’ with students, many lower-ranked universities risked losing a substantial share of their intake, which could be ‘financially crippling’.

Report authors Jack Britton and Ben Waltmann said: ‘Lower-ranked universities could dip into the pool of potential students who got no offers or have not yet applied.

‘These students will have much better grades than usual this year, and many might be interested in going to university given the exceptionally tough labour market.

‘Attracting these students could help the lowest-ranked universities avoid large losses.

It would also pose a new challenge, as many of these students could be underprepared for their courses, especially having missed out on the experience of actually sitting their A Level exams.’

It comes as the government has been urged to take on more students at medical leave letter for office school, where places are highly-competitive and much of the cost of training doctors is met by the taxpayer.

Virus passports and travel corridors could allow families to travel abroad this summer

Virus passports and travel corridors could allow families to travel abroad this summer.

A quarantine regime will be introduced on June 8 requiring arrivals to the UK to self-isolate one day leave application for urgent work 14 days.

But ministers hope to strike quarantine-free pacts or ‘air bridges with summer destinations – such as France, Spain and Greece – by August and possibly July.

They are also examining the idea of ‘Covid passports’ to let those who have had the disease travel more widely and without having to go into quarantine on their return.

Home Secretary Priti Patel said she is ‘absolutely open’ to the idea of air bridges between nations sparking fresh hope for Britons wanting to travel abroad in the summer months. 

The new border regime will apply to almost all arrivals, including incoming Britons. 

Rule breakers face an initial fine of £1,000.

Further non-compliance could result in unlimited fines.

Limited quarantine exemptions will be allowed for truck drivers, seasonal fruit pickers and a small number of essential workers.

The ban is understood to have been opposed by multiple cabinet ministers, including transport Secretary Grant Shapps and business secretary Alok Sharma. 

Pictured: Passengers wearing PPE queue up to board a China-bound flight at Terminal 2 of Heathrow Airport on Friday

Virus passports and travel corridors could allow families to travel abroad this summer.

Pictured: Passengers wearing PPE queue up to board a China-bound flight at Terminal 2 of Heathrow Airport today

Passengers wearing personal protective equipment queued up to board a flight at Heathrow Airport on Friday

Passengers wearing personal protective equipment queued up to board a flight at Heathrow Airport today

Ms Patel said: ‘When it comes to air bridges, look, I think we should be absolutely open to all ideas.’

‘This is not for today, but this doesn’t mean we should rule this out in the future.’

Ms Patel said quarantine was vital to prevent new cases of coronavirus being brought in from abroad.

But the policy was criticised by the aviation and tourism sectors, the wider business community and even some Tory MPs.

Plexiglass panels protect an umbrella and sunbeds as a preventive measure taken to curb the spread of coronavirus in Santorini

Plexiglass panels protect an umbrella and sunbeds as a preventive measure taken to curb the spread of coronavirus in Santorini

Priti Patel today announced all travellers returning to the UK from abroad will face a mandatory 14 days in quarantine 

Almost 500,000 BTEC students will have to wait another week to get their grades after the exam board axed results hours before they were due to be released today

Almost 500,000 BTEC students will have to wait another week to get their grades after the exam board axed results hours before they were due to be released today.

Pearson, the provider of BTECs, yesterday told schools and colleges not to publish results in the vocational qualifications to give them time to re-grade them in line with A-levels and GCSEs – which are now being graded via teacher assessments. 

This means that students face another week waiting for their BTEC grades – including 250,000 who received ‘downgrades’ marks last week for their A-level equivalent exams.  

The 11th hour move last night came despite Pearson being warned a week ago about a ‘systemic issue’ with grading, it was claimed today. 

The parent of one BTEC student said the decision to withhold final grades has left his son feeling like a ‘second-class student’. 

Caleb Taylor, 19, is waiting for the results of his level three Btec in computing and business.

His father, Richard, said he has been unable to enrol at his college in Gwent for next year without knowing his final grades.

He said: ‘I think it’s a disgrace.

He feels like he is a second-class student, and Btecs are seen as less important than A-levels because they have been sorted out last.

‘Technical qualifications shouldn’t be seen as less than. My son is really anxious because he doesn’t know what he will be doing next year.

‘He plans to go to university but it is a good thing he didn’t want to go this year because he would have missed out on his space.

‘There has just been no communication, we just don’t know what is going on.’

This morning, David Hughes, chief executive of the Association of Colleges, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘We’d been talking to Pearson ever since the results came out last Thursday and we knew there were lots and lots of problems, lots of students not getting the results they really should have got, lots of colleges saying to us that actually this just doesn’t look right, and we were saying to Pearson ‘is this just isolated cases or is it a more systemic issue’?

‘I think what they’ve realised is that both the level three results last week, but perhaps more importantly for the results that were due today, that this was a system issue and they really needed to do a thorough review.’  

Exam board Pearson has pulled its BTEC results less than 24 hours before releasing them, sparking a fresh round of results chaos for nearly half a million pupils (stock)

Exam board Pearson has pulled its BTEC results less than 24 hours before releasing them, sparking a fresh round of results chaos for nearly half a million pupils (stock)

BBC Radio 4 was told by Bexleyheath Academy in South East London that some results papers give both grades on the same piece of paper – so the principal is giving out BTEC grades today because there are on the same piece of paper as the GCSEs.

Schools minister Nick Gibb today told Sky News that BTEC results were being reviewed and they will be ‘they’ll be reissuing them hopefully next week’.  

The National Education Union’s co-general secretary said the Government now ‘must put an end’ to the ‘incompetence’ around the issuing of the Btec results. 

Dr Mary Bousted said: ‘Teachers know their students better than any model or algorithm and it will be a relief to many that the grades they receive are now a fairer reflection of their achievements.

‘To add to the GCSE and A-level fiasco, the decision by (examiner) Pearson not to issue Btec results at the eleventh hour compounds the upsetting and chaotic experience for students.

‘Government must put an end to this incompetence and work quickly to ensure every young person gets the grades they deserve to move on to the next stages of their lives.’

The development will also cause even further disruption to students seeking places in higher education, with universities under pressure from thousands of pupils scrambling to get their first choices after the U-turn led to improved grades. 

Mr Hughes added: ‘This is a decision that is kind of the result of lots and lots of poor decisions over many weeks.

‘One thing we’ve got to do I think in the fullness of time is a full review, independent review, open and transparent into what went wrong, not to blame people, but really to understand what’s happened, because confidence in the system has been completely blown.

‘Ofqual wanted integrity in the system to be at the heart of all this, and I think that’s the last thing that’s been achieved.

So the decision by Pearson last night, really late in the day, 11th hour, almost the 12th, hour was probably the right decision, just a shame it came so late.

Pearson, the provider of BTECs, told schools and colleges not to publish level 1 and 2 results in the vocational qualifications to give them time to re-grade them in line with A-levels and GCSEs - which are being graded via teacher assessments (stock)

Pearson, the provider of BTECs, told schools and colleges not to publish level 1 and 2 results in the vocational qualifications to give them time to re-grade them in line with A-levels and GCSEs – which are being graded via teacher assessments (stock)

‘But sometimes it is better to make the right decision rather than carry on and get very, very unfair outcomes for students.’

Alex Dyer, CEO and Founder of Tutor House, told MailOnline: ‘This delay means that they will not be able to go to Sixth Form, College or apprenticeships as they have to wait for their grades, which could be a few weeks, whilst those who studied GCSE’s are moving on with their lives.

‘The government are ignoring the poorer students as well as the less regarded qualifications.’

Simon Reichwald, Strategic Lead for Talent at MyKindaFuture, commented: ‘This year’s results saga has caused an incredible amount of unnecessary distress and worry for a whole year group of students, particularly those who have studied for BTEC qualifications. 

‘The ongoing confusion around the marking system is likely to impact the young people affected for years to come, whether they choose to continue their studies or move into the world of work. 

‘Some employers and education providers may unfairly assume that a young person from the class of 2020 had their grade inflated, and therefore interrogate them on their qualifications much more than they would usually. 

‘Young people will have to pre-empt this in their interviews and demonstrate additional skills, such as extra-curricular achievements, in order to ensure they are competitive against previous year groups, putting them at an immediate disadvantage.

‘Sadly, this is likely to have the biggest impact on those who already come from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

The shock 11th-hour move affects 450,000 pupils in the UK, all due to collect results tomorrow morning along with GCSE candidates (pictured: students from Codsall Community High School march to the constituency office of local MP Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, as a protest over the continuing issues of last week's A level results)

The shock 11th-hour move affects 450,000 pupils in the UK, all due to collect results tomorrow morning along with GCSE candidates (pictured: students from Codsall Community High School march to the constituency office of local MP Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, as a protest over the continuing issues of last week’s A level results)

‘We know that many talented individuals from underprivileged backgrounds already suffer from a lack of self-belief, and the results saga is likely to have dented their confidence even further. 

‘Due to their vocational nature, BTECs are still unfairly considered less credible than A-Levels by many employers and those who have completed their qualifications this year will now have the added worry that they will be judged more harshly than those from previous year groups.’

Labour’s Shadow Education Seccretary Kate Green told ITV’s Good Morning Britain: ‘I think it’s utterly outrageous, it’s chaos after chaos now and at the end of this are young people psyching themselves up to receive their results, wanting to plan their futures for the next step in their studies and being let down again and again by the Government. 

‘And now to hear that not only the results that were due today are delayed until we don’t know when but some of the results received last week might have to be reviewed and adjusted, and still don’t know what they should do next.

I think it’s absolutely shameful, they are in the middle of a fiasco no way of their making.’

The late decision follows the Government’s botched handling of its A-level results fiasco and comes after Labour and education unions call for Downing Street to explain why BTEC students had been left out of Monday’s grading U-turn. 

It is likely to spark fears that delays in the publication of BTEC results could risk pupils taking the vocational qualification being ‘squeezed out’ of higher education.  

In a request letter for leave to schools, Cindy Rampersaud, Pearson’s senior VP, said: ‘We appreciate this will cause additional uncertainty for students and we are sorry about this.

‘Our priority is to ensure fair outcomes for BTEC students in relation to A levels and GCSEs and that no BTEC student is disadvantaged.’ 

Pearson apologised for the ‘additional uncertainty for students’ the move will cause, with a spokeswoman saying: ‘Following Ofqual’s announcement that A-level and GCSE students are to receive centre-assessed grades, we will be applying the same principles for students receiving BTEC results this summer.

‘We will be regrading BTECs to address concerns about unfairness in relation to A-levels and GCSEs and ensure no BTEC student is disadvantaged.’

She added: ‘We know this could cause additional uncertainty for students and we are sorry about this.

Our priority is to ensure fair outcomes for BTEC students and we will work around the clock to provide revised grades as soon as we can.’ 

Kate Green, Labour’s shadow education secretary, said: ‘This latest chaos is totally unacceptable.

For some young people to find out less than a day in advance that they will not be receiving their grades tomorrow is utterly disgraceful.

‘It’s appalling that thousands of young people should face further confusion and uncertainty because of the Government’s incompetence.

‘This repeated chaos is simply no way to run a country.

The Government must urgently set a clear deadline for every young person to receive their grades.’ 

Liberal Democrat education spokesperson Layla Moran said: ‘This is yet another shambles from the Government.

‘It seems the Conservatives, bumbling from one crisis to the next, simply forgot about a half a million students awaiting their BTEC grades, and had to pull the results at the last minute.

Meanwhile, the Education Secretary is still in his job and the Prime Minister is still on holiday.